New Walkability app for iPhone and iPad

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, Buying a new home, Crowdsourcing, iPad, iPhone, mapping, Open Data, Property search, Uncategorized, urban walkability, walkability

We are excited to announce the launch of the new Walkonomics app for iPhone and iPad.  The free Walkonomics mobile app maps and rates the pedestrian-friendliness of every street in San Francisco, New York and England (over 600,000 streets!). 

New Walkability App for Android

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, community participation, Crowdsourcing, iPhone, mapping, mashup, Open Data, pedestrians, Smartphones, streets, Uncategorized, urban walkability, walkability, walking, wayfinding

When it comes to walking in the city, a smartphone is now almost as important as a good pair of shoes.  Our phones provide us with pedestrian sat-nav, reviews of the best places to visit and even measure how many calories we’re burning, while we walk.  In fact recent research suggests that our phones are encouraging us to walk further in the city and explore more places.

Now a new mobile app from Walkonomics provides an essential tool for the walkable lifestyle.  The Walkonomics app enables people to check the walkability of the street they’re standing in, as well as discover new walkable streets in other areas and add their own reviews.  The free app, which is available for Android devices, uses over 600,000 street ratings from Walkonomics.com, covering every street in San Francisco, New York and England.  

Does the Hilliness of San Francisco affect it’s Walkability?

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in apps, California, crime, Crowdsourcing, footways, Hilliness, mapping, mashup, Open Data, pedestrians, San Francisco, sidewalks, Steep Hills, urban walkability, walkability, wayfinding, web tools

San Francisco is famous for its steep hills, in fact they are part of what makes the city so distinctive and unique.  There are over 50 hills within the city and while they provide some great views once you’re at the top, they can also be a real pain to walk up!

Rating walkability by combining Open Data and Crowdsourcing

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in apps, Crowdsourcing, London, mapping, New York, Open Data, streets, urban walkability, walkability, web tools

It’s generally agreed that walkable streets, neighbourhoods and cities are a good thing.  Walkable areas produce a whole range of benefits that include:

  • less obesity and healthier residents;

  • boosting property values and the economy;

  • fewer traffic accidents;

  • reduced CO2 emissions;

  • and maybe even more people walking!

But perhaps a harder question is: How do we know if a street or area is walkable?

Is it just about how many different destinations are within walking distance of any particular spot?  While that’s a really important factor, its obviously not the only one.

Take a tour

Take a tour of a walkable street

Walkable cities?