Author Archive

The Digital Life of Walkable Streets

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Architecture, Flickr, FourSquare, London, mapping, Mobile, Open Data, Photography, Research, Smartphones, Social Media, streets, walkability, Yahoo Labs

Unsplash_JayWennington_640px It may be hard to believe, but each day we post over 1.8 billion photos to the internet, thats over 20,000 a second! While many of these are likely to be selfies, there must be many millions of photos of everyday streets and urban places.  Each of these photographs holds valuable data about the qualities of each street, but because this data is in a visual format it can be hard to analyse and make sense of the huge number of images that are being posted to social media every day.

However, in a recent collaboration between Walkonomics and researchers from Yahoo Labs (Daniele QuerciaLuca Maria Aiello and Rossano Schifanella) we have been able to begin to understand what millions of urban street photos can tell us about walkability.

Find the most beautiful walking route to anywhere in your city

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, Buenos Aires, Glasgow, iPhone, London, Mobile, New York, Open Data, OpenStreetMap, Paris, San Francisco, Toronto, walking, wayfinding

Walkonomics iPhone App - Pedestrian Navigation If you’ve ever used a navigation app to find your way through a city, then its very likely that the app only showed you the fastest route to your destination. Saving time is really important, but what if you could find a route that was fast and improved your mood?

The new updated Walkonomics app for iPhone and Android, can do just that. We’ve added navigation to Walkonomics, that will not only find the fastest walking route, but can also find the most beautiful route to any place in a city. Walkonomics does this by analysing over 1.7 million street trees, thousands of urban parks and over 46,000km of streets and footpaths.

WalkHood: Which parts of your neighbourhood can you walk to in 5 minutes?

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, Barriers to walking, iPhone, mapping, Mobile, OpenStreetMap, walkability, WalkHood, Walksheds

Walkonomics_iPhone5_WalkHood_640px We’re very happy to say that the Walkonomics app for iPhone and Android is getting an upgrade and makeover today!  We have just launched version 2 of our free mobile app and not only does the app look and perform better, we’ve added some great new features.  The most exciting of which are its new WalkHood maps.

Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Barcelona, Barriers to walking, Canberra, community participation, Copenhagen, demographics, London, streets, Uncategorized, Urbanisation, Walk21, walkability


We live in a world that is urbanising at an astonishing rate: 100 years ago only 20% of people lived in a city, by 2010 more than half the worlds population was living in an urban area and by 2050 we expect that figure to rise to 70%.  As these mega-cities become increasingly dense and over-populated, the transport systems that support them are struggling to cope with the sheer numbers of people trying to move around.  Many cities around the world are starting to wake up to the fact that they will have to become walkable and bikeable, just in order to function in the future.

How Walkable are the Streets of Toronto?

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in apps, Buying a new home, Canada, community participation, mapping, Open Data, Toronto, walkability, walking

Hello Toronto!  Our street walkability data is now live for the entire city.  Walkonomics is very happy to announce that we have launched in Toronto, Canada. Walkonomics has brought it’s unique way of measuring walkability at street-level to the wonderful city of Toronto.  

New Walkability app for iPhone and iPad

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, Buying a new home, Crowdsourcing, iPad, iPhone, mapping, Open Data, Property search, Uncategorized, urban walkability, walkability

We are excited to announce the launch of the new Walkonomics app for iPhone and iPad.  The free Walkonomics mobile app maps and rates the pedestrian-friendliness of every street in San Francisco, New York and England (over 600,000 streets!). 

Why Walkability Isn’t Just About Proximity To Shops

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in accessibility, Architecture, Carbon emissions, Design, Green spaces, land use, pedestrians, Proximity, sidewalks, streets, Streetscape, urban design, walkability

For many people, the concept of ‘Walkability’ simply means how many shops, cafe’s, schools and other services are within walking distance of a particular location.  While this is a really important part of a walkable neighbourhood (people won’t walk if there is nothing to walk to) there is a growing body of evidence that suggests that several other factors improve or reduce the walkability of a street or neighbourhood.

Now a new book by urban designer Julie Campoli adds to this discussion by exploring several key factors that combine to create truly walkable streets and communities.  In her new book from the Lincoln Institute: Made for Walking: Density and Neighborhood Form, Campoli argues that simply having shops, services and venues within walking distance is not enough.

New Walkability App for Android

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in Android, apps, community participation, Crowdsourcing, iPhone, mapping, mashup, Open Data, pedestrians, Smartphones, streets, Uncategorized, urban walkability, walkability, walking, wayfinding

When it comes to walking in the city, a smartphone is now almost as important as a good pair of shoes.  Our phones provide us with pedestrian sat-nav, reviews of the best places to visit and even measure how many calories we’re burning, while we walk.  In fact recent research suggests that our phones are encouraging us to walk further in the city and explore more places.

Now a new mobile app from Walkonomics provides an essential tool for the walkable lifestyle.  The Walkonomics app enables people to check the walkability of the street they’re standing in, as well as discover new walkable streets in other areas and add their own reviews.  The free app, which is available for Android devices, uses over 600,000 street ratings from, covering every street in San Francisco, New York and England.  

Does the Hilliness of San Francisco affect it’s Walkability?

Written by Adam Davies on . Posted in apps, California, crime, Crowdsourcing, footways, Hilliness, mapping, mashup, Open Data, pedestrians, San Francisco, sidewalks, Steep Hills, urban walkability, walkability, wayfinding, web tools

San Francisco is famous for its steep hills, in fact they are part of what makes the city so distinctive and unique.  There are over 50 hills within the city and while they provide some great views once you’re at the top, they can also be a real pain to walk up!

Take a tour

Take a tour of a walkable street